Designing for Domestic Memorialization and Remembrance: A Field Study of Fenestra in Japan
15470
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Designing for Domestic Memorialization and Remembrance: A Field Study of Fenestra in Japan

Year

2016

Abstract

We describe the design, implementation, and deployment of Fenestra, a domestic technology embodied in the form of a wirelessly connected round mirror, photo frame, and candle that displays photos of departed loved ones. Fenestra’s interaction design, form, and materials are inspired by Japanese domestic practices of memorializing departed loved ones with a home altar called butsudan. We deployed Fenestra in three Japanese households to explore how this design artifact might support everyday domestic practices of memorialization, and where complications might potentially emerge. Findings reveal that a range of outcomes emerged across our participants’ experiences of living with Fenestra—from profound remembrance to unexpected uses to unsettling encounters. These findings are interpreted to present opportunities for future research and practice initiatives in the HCI community.

Award

Honorable Mention

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Category
Article
Tags
Fenestra, KMD